Saturday, September 30, 2006

This Is (Not) the End (Yet)

The list, such as it is, continues. Please try to contain your enthusiasm. Given the content and quality of Mo's recent musings I accept this line of posting's presence on this page is the equivalent of William Shatner sharing a mic with Paul Robeson. The internet, like tv, is some kind of incongruity generator, I guess.


30. BEATLES Revolver (1966)
Some unfortunates can listen to the Stones without noticing the brain damage it is causing. Other unfortunates can listen to the Beatles, or worse yet, Paul McCartney, and not notice the cavities forming in their brains as a result of the insipid, saccharined offerings he began to spew out, I can't say when (1965? at birth?), but I hope he stops. Maybe he will produce a rage-filled screed against people with odd-numbered limbs once his divorce is finalized... angry Paul. The balance of this album is good enough (well, I think so) to overcome the dross and still rate highly. There is no point describing any album by the Beatles. Your parents own it. FS: I Want to Tell You


29. VAN MORRISON Astral Weeks (1967)
I can barely recall the midnight in a smoke filled hockey trip Buffalo motel room bacchanal wherein I was introduced to “Van the Man” by our back-up goalie. I detested it briefly before passing out. I got this record this a few years later as my phony hippie thing was in full stride. I loved it then and still do. For a short Irish guy in a caftan, Mr. Morrison made some haunting and beautiful music. Sadly, it isn’t on any of his other records that I’ve heard. FS: Ballerina


28. JOHNNY CASH Live at Folsom Prison (1968)
E likes this album and knows more of the lyrics than I do. Of course, I don’t really pay attention to lyrics unless she is singing them. FS: Jackson


27. NEKO CASE Fox Confessor Brings the Flood (2006)
I will confess this though it may mean my death: I love this woman (her voice, anyway). I don’t know what to make of this record. It’s like, deep, or something. In any event, this appears to be an example of contemporary music which is considered, played well, and which does not suck. FS: John Saw That Number


26. THE DUKES OF STRATOSPHEAR 25 O’Clock (1985)
XTC by any other name is way funnier than XTC (and still good). FS: Bike Ride to the Moon


25. FLEETWOOD MAC Live at the Boston Tea Party (1998)
Recorded a matter of weeks before Peter Green left the band to become Jesus or something like that, this album captures my favourite Mac right before it ended, while Green was apparently disintegrating as a result of narcotic abuse, or just being crazy, playing shows in robes, wearing a crucifix, etc.. Using the Clapton reference to no good effect, Peter Green was god or at least he may have feared that was the case. FS: Green Manalishi


24. CREAM Disraeli Gears (1967)
I am not a huge fan of Clapton. Too many drunken albums, fey lyrics, and Phil Collins associations. This band, however, was the band Zeppelin wanted to be. All three of these guys go to school while spouting some, er, heavy lyrics which were not in the slightest way influenced by, er, LSD. This band was too intense to last for long (or, too loaded to stand up for long, I can’t quite remember). FS: We’re Going Wrong


23. JACO PASTORIUS Jaco (1976)
I am not aware of any other bass players who suffered the triple indignity of living on the street and being beaten to death by a night club manager and ending up on my list. Oh! The bathos! FS: Kuru/Speak Like a Child


22. STEELY DAN Pretzel Logic (1974)
The last appearance on this list by the mama-hammering session drummer, Jim Gordon. This band was able to combine the exceptionally low-brow with a high degree of sophistication and they did so here with great variety and precision. Well-crafted but not inhuman sounding pop. FS: With a Gun


21. EAST BAY RHYTHM A Little Love Will Help (2002)
This album is funkier that a sweatshirt worn for 10 consecutive workouts and stored in a gym bag between exercise events (and I make no apologies for enjoying the disco passages,., this is a late-release 70s product). Of course, you need consider the source (me) when assessing the validity of the preceding analogy. By way of reference, my hockey equipment was treated in a manner similar to that described above with similar results but I thought that reference too arcane. At least you can try the sweatshirt thing at home. FS: Chuda


20. HERBIE HANCOCK HeadHunters (1973)
Apparently this is an influential work. Since I am influenced easily I purchased this album after reading about it somewhere.

So, buy this album. It won’t hurt a bit. FS: Watermelon Man


19. PINK FLOYD Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967)
As my list discloses, at least to me, I enjoy music written and performed by young men losing their minds while the tape is running. This is a prime example of that, mmm, genre. Maybe it would look more like a genre if I employed hyphens. The degree of psychedelic whimsy on this album is off the charts, not that there is a chart showing that sort of thing. I have listened to this album far too many times for it to be healthy. FS: Flaming


18. TAJ MAHAL The Natch’l Blues (1968)
Great late 60’s electric blues with arrangements and guitar from the incomparable Jesse Ed Davis. That guy was too cool for school. Of course, he died in a Laundromat in the late 80’s, so what do I know. FS: The Cuckoo


17. JANE’S ADDICTION Ritual de lo Habitual (1991)
I used to hang out with this Croatian guy. His family came from Split. He was friends with this Split-connected kid who lived in Santa Indica or some such place. He told me one nefarious eve to listen to JA. They were “awesome”, or ”wicked” or something. I laughed it off and bought Europe ’72, which is a horrible album by an entirely overrated band. Later, much later, I heard this album and it blew me away. The guy was right- this album is awesome. I guess I am just another angry white guy. Hmm.

Boy, I sure feel cool referring to these guys now… since the demise of the band one of them dated Ms. Morissette, one is a dj at cheese shops, tea houses, and other places where crustless sandwiches are served, and another is both a tv relationship-ho and host of the execrable “Rock Star” series. You know, referring to these guys makes me feel old and slightly silly. FS: Three Days


16. LITTLE FEAT Waiting for Columbus (1978)
The most overrated underrated band of which I am aware. There isn’t a throwaway on this cd. Rather than attempt to explain or justify my decision I urge you to download the following song. FS: Fat Man in the Bathtub


15. JOHN COLTRANE Afro Blue Impressions (2000)
As one may surmise, if you have slogged through this list: I enjoy extemporized pieces. Coltrane, for those of you who live in caves (yet somehow have wireless) was a master at taking a simple theme and expanding on it, and expanding further, and then doing scales (what’s with that?). He changed how I listen to music. He is not alone in so doing (the top 30 acts each have done that to varying degrees) but of that lot he is somewhat distinct in avinge attempted to achieve the spiritual through music (or something like that). McCoy Tyner has a solo on this record (recorded live in the early 1960s), which is the aural equivalent of gratifying sex with a human (because there are other kinds of… nevermind). FS: Spiritual

Deeply embarrassed for discussing my record collection, again, P-man out.

4 Comments:

Blogger Granny said...

I'm still musing over Shatner and Robeson.

10:34 AM  
Anonymous motherwoman said...

Ah honey -- you know I could NEVER laptop-discjockey like you though. Ah the richness of this blog.

One oversight -- I don't just like the Live from Folsom.. I birthed your child to it

10:53 AM  
Blogger Mr Big Dubya said...

Again, I am in awe of the diversity. I am a piker and genuflect at the altar of your eclecticism.

In other worrds - cool fuckin' list.

10:57 AM  
Anonymous CroutonBoy said...

You own an album by Chris Kattan?

Can I simultaneously admire and be confused by your diversity? I think I like Little Feat, but not enough to listen to it with any regularity. However, Jane's Addiction & Neko Case (and Bill Shatner) are all worthy choices.

I bought that Herbie Hancock album for the exact same reason, and also have not regretted it.

12:19 PM  

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